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Thursday, October 02, 2014

Preferred Site Articles

  • Helicobacter Pylori

    Helicobacter Pylori: China Travel Risk


    I just wanted to share something with the gang here, especially those that plan on going to Shaolin. I've mentioned some of the health issues before, but this one is significant. Common. And not that easily detected.

    There is a HUGE problem with fecal-oral transmission of diseases in China, mainly because of poor sanitation, improper water treatment, and the use of human shit for fertilization of crops. The ease of transmission of human disease from one individual to another is very high. In fact, most US travelers to China, who stay for any significant period of time, get some sort of dysenteric illness.

    It's the non-dysenteric illness, that's going to get you, long term. And that is, H. Pylori infection. Oh, remember, you get it from using chopsticks....

    Read this excellent concise report from the CDC about Helicobacter Pylori:


    Quote:
    What is H. pylori?

    Helicobacter

    Read More
  • Seidokan History

    History of Seidokan Karate Kobudo & Toide

    By Boulahfa Mimoun Sensei (8th Dan)

    Salamanca, Spain

    Bienvenido a la Asoc. Nac. SAKURA TAKE KAN

    Shian Toma Sensei was born on November 26, 1929 under the astrological sign of Sagittarius. He is married, has five children, and is a grandfather. Toma Sensei's son holds the rank of 6th Dan in Kendo and is a member of the Okinawan Kendo Team, having been on numerous occasions the Okinawan Kendo Champion. He continues his profession as a police officer. Toma Sensei had his first dojo in the city of Awase. Later he moved his dojo to Koza (currently Okinawa City) where it has been for a long time, near the local US Air Force Base at Kadena where sensei worked as a bus driver. He established his dojo outside of Gate 2 just two blocks to the left. It originally started out as a

    Read More
  • Head Conditioning

    "I want to do Iron Head Qi Gong."

    Imagine, hitting yourself on the head to cure headaches. Not exactly an outcome one would expect now, is it....

    The whole concept of head conditioning kind of frightens me. Yes, it's a common phenomena in Shaolin, in fact, you can find most of the monks have had some sort of experience with head conditioning. This whole theatrical smacking the iron bar on the head always kind of fascinated me, in a morbid kind of way, as, from a distance, which most people view this show from, it looks kind of nasty. Not exactly the kind of thing one would want to do to oneself. But, one day, I got the opportunity to play with these little iron bars, and it became very obvious to me, that shattering them is not all that hard. If you smack one gently against the sidewalk, or

    Read More
  • Dim Mak: The tradition and science

    A 16-year-old baseball player from northern New Jersey died after being hit in the chest by a pitch during practice, MyFoxNY.com reported.

    Xxxxx xxxxxs, who was a sophomore at Garfield High School, went into cardiac arrest following the incident on Friday night. He was pronounced dead about an hour later at St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center in Paterson.

    At the time of the accident, Adams, a catcher, was practicing with a pitcher. He was wearing a chest protector, and the teen’s father said his son was in good health and had no known medical conditions.

    Xxxxs was practicing with a Paterson-based traveling team that was preparing for a tournament in Florida later this month. His teammates have decided to play in the tournament, deciding it was the best way to honor his memory.

    What does this have to do with the concept of Dim Mak, an ancient Chinese method, known

    Read More
  • Old Shaolin History

    A brief discussion is warranted here. Getting into a complete history of the Temple would be difficult to say the least, as many of the written texts have been destroyed in the various burnings and sackings (especially the one that occurred in 1928). And for some reason, getting this information from the monks is not easy because of the language barriers, and, because, in my opinion, some of them really don't know much about it. Education, and it's goals, is far different for these guys than what we in the western world are used to. So, with a deference to brevity, here goes.

    1122-255BC: Chou dynasty, mentions of boxing and other martial arts in literature.

    722-481BC: The art of warfare is mainly reserved for nobility, and among other things, archery, chariot driving, and arithmetic is taught.

    403-221BC: War takes on less of a nobility preference, and becomes more of a
    Read More
  • Medical Travel Advisory

    Traveling to China, Shaolin, or Asia in general presents some risks from a medical standpoint. Being prepared for these risks will further enhance the quailty of your time spent abroad. The following is a brief summary of medical advice for physicians, that presents a well rounded overview of the various health related issues when dealing with traveling abroad. More specific information can be found in the Forum / Library, in the "doc's Hospital" section.

    Travel abroad should be an exciting and rewarding experience.... However, potential but preventable health hazards, which vary from one country to another, need to be considered. The following information will assist clinicians in helping travelers avoid health problems when they go abroad.

     

    Read More
  • Traveler's Diarrhea

    Summary

    The use of preventive measures and self-treatment for travelers' diarrhea is routine in regions where the occurrence of diarrhea is predictably high. People traveling to these areas who do not exercise care in their selection of consumed foods and beverages will suffer high rates of illness. Such diarrhea normally affects the traveler for a day, although it can result in chronic postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Although systemic antibacterial drugs are effective in preventing diarrhea, their use is not routinely recommended because of side effects and their importance as a therapy for extra-intestinal infections. This review focuses on current and future uses of antibacterial drugs in the prevention and therapy of travelers' diarrhea. Minimally absorbed (<0.4%) rifaximin can effectively reduce the occurrence of travelers' diarrhea without side effects. Bismuth subsalicylate is a useful alternative, although it is less effective than rifaximin for the prevention of travelers' diarrhea and the required
    Read More
  • Vows

    The Vows

     

    The following are scans taken out of my "monk book", at least, that's how I refer to it. Having one does not afford you any privileges, but, this is what you get after you take part in the "Taking Refuge" ceremony, and become a disciple of the temple and of one of the temple's masters.

    The translation is finally finished, and is below the pictures of the book.  It was especially difficult to get through, because not only is it written and printed in Traditional Mandarin (as opposed to the presently used Simplified), but it is an older form of Traditional Mandarin. The grammar is different than what is commonly seen with the older Traditional Mandarin. I'd like to thank Lu Ruiling and his Buddhist professor friends for spending the time with this translation.

    The booklet is basically a book of rules ("Don't kill people, don't follow

    Read More
  • Traditional vs Wushu

    What's the easiest way to distinguish traditional style from Wushu?

    Actually, it's pretty easy. Traditional gong fu usually is performed in a straight line, whereby the practitioner just goes back and forth performing his moves. With some of the animal forms, and with some of the advanced forms (Lohan Chuan, Ying Chuan (eagle), and Tong Long Chuan (praying mantis) comes to mind, for example) there might be some small "branches" that the practitioner moves on or off of that proverbial straight line, but how far one goes all depends upon the practitioner. Technically, traditional gong fu can be performed on one line, and, in a small space.

    Wu shu, on the other hand, tends to be more circular in its layout, and, "all over the place". Remember, just because the kicks are high and acrobatic, or the stances low and the sweeps frequent, doesn't mean it's wu shu. Some of
    Read More
  • Tai Ji: Clinical Implications

    Tai Chi, a Chinese bodymind exercise, has been used in China for thousands of years for both prevention and therapeutic purposes. In the 1990s, the Western research community started to examine the effectiveness of Tai Chi interventions using scientific research design and standardized outcome measures. A number of reviews of these studies have been published. Based on an extensive literature search, this state-of-the-art review identified 25 such reviews published since 2000, provides a description of them, and summarizes what was learned from these reviews. Although there is still a need to understand more about Tai Chi interventions, especially Tai Chi's mechanism, it is concluded that Tai Chi is a very useful exercise format that can be used for a variety of chronic disease conditions. It requires no equipment and little space, and it can be practiced anytime, anywhere, and by older adults and individuals with chronic diseases. Since short forms

    Read More
  • Shaolin Destruction

    The pages in this attached collection of images were published on the internet in russbo.com on a day by day basis in August / September 2000, as these events were unfolding. Messages were sent to me, via friends that I had had in Shaolin at the time. No news organizations were aware of these events at the time of their publication on russbo.com. The Chinese had prevented news people from entering the area. In fact, russbo.com became a source of information for various news organizations, politicians, and, eventually, the Voice of America.

    It was the Voice of America that brought this event to public attention. And they did so, at the United Nations… The uproar and embarrassment that followed went from the Chinese ambassador straight to the vice presidency of China., who, at that time, was a friend of Shi Yong Xin’s. This brought a sudden end to the destruction of

    Read More
  • Xiao Hong Quan

    SHAOLIN Xiao Hong Chuan

    Mistakenly translated as “Little red boxing”, in reality, Hong family small form

     

    This is a basic traditional form.

     

    ·         feet together, hands over head to prayer position and bow,

       hands to sides,legs straight to 3 feet apart, horse stance looking       

       left

    ·         r palm face down above umbilicus, l palm face up below, face forward

    ·         r palm up over head, l palm down touching l buttock. Look left

    ·         move to left leaning dragon towards 9 with r downward parry, r pulls back to upward palm at side,l knife hand out to 9

    ·         r reaches out to grab groin,l sliding shuto down arm, r pulls back over head, pull back into monkey position r upright arm next to r side of head, l toes straight down, l arm fist straight down at l,

    ·         move to 9 leaning dragon
    Read More
  • Cult Behavior

    It's a fairly commonplace behavior, found in martial arts schools all over the world. And when you throw in the semi deity status that some people attribute to the so called Shaolin monks, you find activity and interactions that range from the comical to the downright absurd and dangerous.

    Here's a definition that you really need to keep in mind when interacting with martial artists of all kinds, especially those that devote a lot of time and energy to some of these Shaolin related personalities.

    The Cult: Definitions, Patterns, and Behaviors.

    When identifying cults and cult like behavior, most sociologist and psychologist agree that there are three aspects of their behavior that should be evaluated. As all cults are different in their approaches, a cult may have one or more identifying factors from each category, or, may just predominantly reside within one. Let's take a look at all three.


    Sociological

    Read More
  • Money and ATM's

    One issue that comes up from time to time, is the issue of money, how to get it, whether to bring it, where to keep it. In the past, American Express Travelers Cheques were a good way to travel with money, as if you lost them, they could be replaced. The problem with those were, back in the 1990's and even today, is getting them changed for actual cash when you're traveling China. Even getting a cash advance from a credit card can be difficult, unless you go to the bigger, better known banks in China, such as Bank of China. The easiest way to access funds when traveling Asia, is via an ATM card.

     

    Read More
  • Wing Chun Historical Concepts

    Wing Chun is arguably the most famous single style within the Shaolin system. It was made known to the west by Bruce Lee and James Lee in the late 1960s in what was the single most influential introduction of Chinese Gung Fu outside China (one might equate Bruce Lee's bringing of gung fu to American television in 1964 with the arrival of the Beatles in America two years earlier). Despite Lee's rapid evolution of a personal style away from traditional Wing Chun, his association with that style was a major factor in its continued success over the years. More recently, the style has received new publicity following the death of long time grandmaster Yip Man as at least three of his senior disciples have waged an acrimonious conflict over who would inherit the supreme mantle for the style.

     

    Read More
  • Knockout Punch: The neurophysiology

    The pathophysiology behind the "knockout punch", though generally thought to be a simple concept of shutting down the brain because of a suddent impact of energy, is in reality, a complicated one. Knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the brain, though helpful in understanding this, is way beyond the scope and ambition of this article. But one quote, from a neurologist experienced with post traumatic brain injuries, puts the overall concept of the brain into perspective. FYI, axons are the nerve cells that, by numbers of millions and millions, all interact and interconnect to form the almost gelatinous mass of the brain. The brainstem is the area between the brain, which lies in the skull, and the spinal cord, which transmits the information down to the rest of the body.

    Read More
  • Da Lohan Quan

    SHAOLIN Da Lohan Chuan

    Da Lohan boxing

     This is an advanced traditional form.  The following is the abridged version of the first half of the entire Da Lohan; this is what is commonly taught at Shaolin, as "Da Lohan". The true, entire, original Da Lohan, all 108 steps of it, is not commonly known or taught at Shaolin. I know it, but I have yet to put it all down into writing.

        * Stand straight facing 12, bow with right hand in front of chest.
        * Step left, look left, hands at horse position.
        * Left hand opens, gently moves down, then up, move into left facing gong bu, with right inverted punch to 9, left hand on top of right arm.
        * Right hand wraps and grabs, pulls back to horse, as you kick with right leg and then sink into pu bu with left leg straight out to

    Read More
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Head conditioning in the martial arts requires repeated strikes to the head with objects of various sizes, weights and densities. Students of this discipline start with relatively soft objects and progress to using objects of higher density and strength, all with the desire to "condition" their heads to be able to absorb strikes of varying intensity. Conditioning can result in the increased deposition of calcium and bone in the forehead, however, there are no capabilities for the soft tissues of the brain to increase their capacity for trauma. Repeated blows to the head take their toll on the neural tissue underneath the skulll.

Read more: Recurrent Concussions

Category: Health FAQ

Biomechanics and Pathophysiology

    Concussions occur as a result of imparted linear and rotational accelerations to the brain.

    Because of modifying factors (e.g., concussion history, neck strength, anticipatory reaction and varying magnitudes, frequency, and locations of impact), there is currently no known threshold for concussive injury.

Read more: Concussion: Biomechanics, Pathophysiology and Complications

Category: Health FAQ

Master Shi De Yang, Shaolin monk of the 31st generation is dedicated to expanding and preserving the traditional Kung fu practices of the elders generation. In particular the teachings of the last great master of the elders generation, the late Shi Sui Xi, Shi De Yang's master and former abbot of  the Shaolin Temple. In recent times Master De yang has expanded his quest as assigned to him by Shi Sui Xi to share the tradition Kungfu of the elders generation directly to many countries around the world. A relationship  with Kungfu masters from countries such as Spain, Italy, Mexico, Uruguay,  and more recently Australia  has enabled students of these masters around the world to experience the very special experience of being taught from  Master De yang,  in effect Grandmaster Shi De Yang as the masters from  these countries establish the relationship through being his students. Master De yang will travel to the countries of these masters and conduct seminars in Shaolin Quan (Kungfu) and Shaolin Qigong.

Read more: Shi De Yang travels to Australia

Category: Latest News

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Latest Forum / Library Posts

Wednesday, 11 September 2013 23:06
I used to get Newsweek, but then it became intolerably left liberal leaning, and I had to cancel my subscription. I guess a lot of others did the same, as they stopped the print edition months ago, and went purely digital. I still won't buy it. But, according to some emails that I'm getting, there w... Read more...
Sunday, 16 June 2013 18:23
Another worthy little ditty, author unknown: Thai Village Girls…Why Didn’t Someone Tell Me? The template for living life, in other words The Rules for living, for a Village Girl, is the Thai Soap Opera. If there is an event of any kind, particularly a dramatic event, the Soap Opera wi... Read more...
Saturday, 04 May 2013 01:32
As a good friend of mine once said, after living in the Shaolin area for nine months while making a film documentary, "the Chinese are morally corrupt". Read more...
Friday, 17 August 2012 07:26
You have to always keep in mind, that the fire regulations in Asia do not compare with those found in western countries. Or, more clearly stated, don't expect any sort of fire regulations in facilities in Asia... The following article clearly demonstrates this; there's a lesson to be learned from th... Read more...
Tuesday, 14 August 2012 05:34
i love all type of motor bikes and i love all posters and brochures of this product. Read more...

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Shaolin history, politics, martial arts, current events, personalities, all with a unique perspective. With a selection of other traditional martial arts, including Muay Thai, Sanda, Seidokan, and others.

A web site that finds its origins back in 1995, with initial publication in early 1996.  Millions of viewers, thousands of members, hundreds of pages, hundreds of multimedia presentations, and a large group of dedicated contributors. All from a group of people with diverse relevant contacts and interests. A site distributed over three separate domains, and multiple hosting servers.

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